Amy Provan
Pronouns: she/her
Director of Counseling Services
Phone: 410-532-5379
Email: aprovan@ndm.edu

Amy Provan

Amy has enjoyed serving as the Director of Counseling since 2007 where she oversees all aspects of counseling services, including outreach programming, crisis intervention, individual and group psychotherapy, as well as consultation with parents, faculty, and staff. She also provides clinical supervision and training to a group of graduate level students each year.

Amy is a licensed psychologist who is committed to providing culturally sensitive services and to addressing issues of social justice. She utilizes an integrative approach in her work that combines psychodynamic theory, interpersonal process theory, and Acceptance and Commitment Theory (ACT), along with the latest research on mindfulness and neuroplasticity. She also has an interest in working with relationship issues and family dynamics. Amy earned her doctorate in Clinical Psychology at Loyola University of Maryland and completed her doctoral internship at the Baltimore VA Medical Center.

Elizabeth Scott
Pronouns: she/her
Assistant Director of Counseling Services

Elizabeth Scott

Elizabeth is a licensed psychotherapist (LCPC) and has been in clinical practice for over ten years.  Using a psychodynamic and interpersonal approach, Elizabeth works in a holistic way to promote a deeper sense of understanding of self, of relationships, and of current distress.  Elizabeth received her Master’s in Clinical Counseling from Johns Hopkins University. She believes that one of the most important elements of effective therapy is the development of a safe, trusting relationship between therapist and client. Through genuine and respectful connection, the environment in which true healing can occur is created. She incorporates mindfulness techniques and deep breathing practices to help clients better respond to challenges as they arise. Additionally, she provides supervision to members of the Counseling Center clinical staff. Elizabeth considers it a privilege to accompany people in this important work of self-discovery.

Andrea Rackowski
Pronouns: she/her
Psychotherapist

Andrea Rackowski

Andrea is a psychotherapist specializing in supporting adults and young adults on a wide variety of mental health situations and relationship challenges.  She has particular experience and love for work with academic and artistic people in all fields, having worked in and near academic institutions throughout her career.  In addition, she has worked and volunteered for many years with the Intercultural Counseling Connection to support the mental health of international clients, focusing on refugees and asylees in the US.  She is also a certified QPR Gatekeeper trainer (suicide prevention training). Prior to becoming a psychotherapist, Andrea earned a PhD in linguistics.

Pamela Blackwell
Psychology Extern

Pamela Blackwell

Hello! My name is Pamela Blackwell and I’m elated to be a counselor at Notre Dame of Maryland University this year! I’m currently a graduate student at George Washington University where I received my Master of Psychology degree while working towards a Doctorate degree in Psychology. I have a Master of Social Work degree from Savannah State University and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from Spelman College.

My interest in therapy started with my desire to reduce behavioral health disparities in racial/ ethnic minority communities.

My therapeutic framework is rooted in this quote by Matt Haig, “Mental health problems don’t define who you are. They are something you experience. You walk in the rain and you feel the rain, but, importantly, YOU ARE NOT THE RAIN.”

Elaine Dearing
Psychology Extern

Elaine Dearing

Elaine Dearing, M.S. is a current doctoral student at Loyola University of Maryland. She has a previous M.S. in organization development from American University and Bachelor of Arts in public and health policy from Duke University. 

Elaine’s interest in therapy started out with meditation. She sees therapy as a journey that sparks curiosity to live your best life. Her favorite quote is a Buddhist saying that a journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. She thinks you owe it to yourself to take that step today. She looks forward to starting that journey with you today.

Esther Weiner
Psychology Extern

Esther Weiner

My name is Esther Weiner, and I am excited to be at Notre Dame of Maryland University Counseling Center this year! I am currently a graduate student at Loyola University, where I have been able to receive my Master of Science degree in clinical psychology while working towards a PsyD.

Outside of work, I have a wide-ranging list of interests, between cooking, traveling, and finding creative ways to spend time through quarantine. I also aim to view all my interests through a social justice lens, as I find this to be a necessary way to engage in the world, both in and out of the therapy space.

Additionally, when I think of my work as a counselor, I am reminded of the following quote by Brene Brown: "Loving ourselves through the process of owning our story is the bravest thing we will ever do." Seeking counseling is an immensely courageous step, and I consider it to be an honor to join others in their unique processes.

John Paul Schiedermayer
Psychology Extern

John Paul

John Paul is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program at Divine Mercy University. He received a Master of Psychology degree from DMU in 2019 and a B.A. in Philosophy from Seton Hall University in 2015.

John Paul’s interest in therapy is rooted in a keen appreciation for individual and cultural differences and a passion for helping others flourish. His primary goal in therapy is to form a genuine relationship in which the client feels safe, understood, and accepted. Together, through a trusting and collaborative relationship, the client can begin to make sense of their unique experiences and relationships and experience true healing.

John Paul finds encouragement in the following statement from Brene Brown: “Imperfections are not inadequacies; they are reminders that we’re all in this together.” He believes that hearing this quote is, by itself, rather useless. Instead, we need to experience this quote through relationship. Therapy is a great place to do so!