Radiological Sciences

Major

Our Radiological Sciences program partners with The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medical Imaging (JHSMI) to offer both a baccalaureate degree and a pathway to clinical certification in order for you to become a licensed medical imaging technician.

Program Locations

Available Majors

  • Radiological Sciences

Clinical Certification Programs

  • Radiography - 18 months
  • Nuclear Medicine Technology - 18 months
  • Diagnostic Medical Sonography - 14 months
  • Echocardiography - 14 months

Learn More

Admissions Information

Admission to clinical certification programs is highly competitive and acceptance can not be guaranteed.

It is important to thoroughly understand the admissions criteria for your clinical program of interest and regularly confer with the program coordinator as you prepare for clinical study.

How It Works

  1. Complete all requisite general education, mathematics, and science courses at Notre Dame.
  2. Apply to the full time clinical program at JHSMI in the fall semester prior to the start of the program.
  3. Complete all requirements of the clinical certification program.
  4. Choose one of two options for professional training and complete requirements to be awarded a bachelor's degree.
  5. Pass the national registry exam to become a licensed medical imaging technologist.

Professional Training

Option 1 - Two Clinical Concentrations

Note: Not an option for Radiography Students

  • Radiography
  • Nuclear Medicine Technology
  • Diagnostic Medical Sonography
  • Echocardiography
Advanced Imaging Programs

Note: Prior completion of Radiography is required

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (6 months)
  • Computed Tomography (CT) (6 months) 
  • Interventional Cardiovascular (6 months) 

Option 2 - Business Concentration

Note: This concentration is required for Radiography students and is optional for other clinical programs.

Qualify for mid-level positions requiring additional responsibilities in staff management or complex information systems.

Track Options
  • Organizational Management Track
  • Computer Systems Management Track

Courses

  • Human Anatomy and Physiology I: BIO-201 (4 credits)

    Integrates the study of structure with function of the human body. As a suite of courses, BIO-201 and 202 are intended for students interested in satisfying requirements for pharmacy and various allied health programs. The content and level of delivery of both BIO-201 and 202 are structured so that they are compatible with similar courses offered by cooperating institutions. BIO-201 includes discussion of cellular, tissue, integumentary, skeletal, muscular and neural systems. Includes laboratory study of anatomical models of humans and skeletal components, and dissection of a cat. BIO-202 includes discussion of endocrine, circulatory, immunological, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Strongly emphasizes study of physiological functions that includes monitoring of body systems with analog and digital hardware. Each course includes three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. A competency exam covering basic chemistry and biology may be administered at the first class meeting and weighed in the final grade. To begin the course sequence, the student must complete BIO-111 or the equivalent with a minimum grade of C or obtain permission of the instructor. BIO-201 with minimum grade of C is a prerequisite for BIO-202. [ 4 credits each term ]
  • Human Anatomies and Physiology II: BIO-202 (4 credits)

    Integrates the study of structure with function of the human body. As a suite of courses, BIO-201 and 202 are intended for students interested in satisfying requirements for pharmacy and various allied health programs. The content and level of delivery of both BIO-201 and 202 are structured so that they are compatible with similar courses offered by cooperating institutions. BIO-201 includes discussion of cellular, tissue, integumentary, skeletal, muscular and neural systems. Includes laboratory study of anatomical models of humans and skeletal components, and dissection of a cat. BIO-202 includes discussion of endocrine, circulatory, immunological, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Strongly emphasizes study of physiological functions that includes monitoring of body systems with analog and digital hardware. Each course includes three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. A competency exam covering basic chemistry and biology may be administered at the first class meeting and weighed in the final grade. To begin the course sequence, the student must complete BIO-111 or the equivalent with a minimum grade of C or obtain permission of the instructor. BIO-201 with minimum grade of C is a prerequisite for BIO-202. [ 4 credits each term ]
  • Principles of Management: BUS-302 (3 credits)

    Examines organizational, human resources, operational, and functional aspects of ethically managing activities of diverse workforces in organizational settings. Analyzes traditional managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling within the context of changing demands in organizations that compete effectively in an inter-connected, global environment. [ 3 credits ]

  • Principles of Marketing: BUS-303 (3 credits)

    This course introduces the language of marketing the strategic marketing process. While formulating viable marketing strategies for diverse business situations, learners will gain experience gathering and analyzing industry and market data, as well as implementing core-marketing concepts such as market segmentation, targeting, positioning,and the marketing mix in the formulation and implementation of real-world marketing strategies. This course culminates in the development of a marketing plan for a new product, service or retail establishment. [ 3 credits ]
  • Professional Communications: BUS-310 (3 credits)

    Explores communications contexts within organizations and refines written and oral communications skills used in business and professional settings. Emphasizes appropriateness, effectiveness, and nuance while taking into consideration situation, audience, and delivery mode. Learners use common business communications tools and technologies as well as social media. Prerequisite: ENG-101 or IDS-100 (honors section). [3 credits]

  • Teamwork and Negotiation: BUS-334 (3 credits)

    Analyzes the dynamics, structure and function of teams in businesses and other organizations. Examines the framework and components of conflict resolution and negotiation in both organizational and personal situations. Learners will assess and strengthen key interpersonal skills. This course utilizes role active learning pedagogy extensively including role plays, small group exercises, and simulations. [3 credits]
  • Business Research: BUS-360 (3 credits)

    Introduces students to key sources of secondary data and basic research methods that enable them to define the research problem, develop the research plan, collect, evaluate and organize relevant information, develop findings and conclusions and recommend a preferred course of action supported by analysis. Students will learn core primary research concepts such as how to locate key industry and customer information via secondary databases as well as to design an electronic survey and conduct a focus group. [ 3 credits ]
  • Managing Financial Resources: BUS-416 (3 credits)

    Provides students with an overview of the accounting and financial tools necessary for managers. Addresses the development and analysis of basic financial statements, the development of budgets (both operating and capital), and other techniques of financial analysis for management decisionmaking. Prerequisite: general education mathematics requirement. Business majors may not take this course; students who have taken BUS-261 may not take this course. [3 credits]
  • Organizational Behavior: BUS-480 (3 credits)

    Examines the factors affecting human behavior in organizations. Students apply relevant theories to contemporary organizational problems through the use of case analyses, readings and experiential exercises. The course focuses on developing analytical frameworks to describe and assess organizational culture, structure, leadership, ethics, change, decision making, power and political processes. Prerequisite: BUS-302. Cannot be taken if student has taken BUS-394. [3 credits]
  • Human Resource Management: BUS-486 (3 credits)

    Develops knowledge and skills in the human resource management functions of strategic human resource planning, job design, recruitment and selection, training and development, performance management, employee relations and compensation and benefits. Focuses on the legal environment of human resource management and its impact on the entire human resource system. Enhances background students will need to make informed human resource decisions in organizations. Prerequisite: BUS-302. Cannot be taken if student took BUS-315. [3 credits]
  • Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry: CHM-104 (3 credits)

    Emphasizes the fundamental concepts and principles that form the basis of general/ inorganic chemistry and those that are particularly pertinent to the health sciences. The following topics are covered: methods of chemistry, understanding the Periodic Table, chemical bonding and properties, chemical reactions and calculations, acids and bases, solutions, behavior of gases, and quantitative and descriptive aspects of chemistry. Use of practical applications will aid students in understanding scientific problems. Laboratory engages students in a variety of chemical experiments that enhance the understanding of lecture topics. Lab and lecture integrated. Fulfills general education requirement in natural sciences for radiological sciences. [3 credits]
  • Introduction to Organic Chemistry: CHM-106 (3 credits)

    Presents the basic principles of organic chemistry which include identification and reactions of the fundamental groups, system of nomenclature and stereochemistry. Students also will investigate the properties and reactions of complex organic compounds such as carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. The laboratory engages students in techniques and methods that are used by chemists to identify, synthesize and purify organic compounds. Lab and lecture integrated. Prerequisite: CHM-104. [3 credits]
  • General Chemistry I: CHM-110 (4 credits)

    Focuses on fundamental chemical concepts and principles with emphasis on inorganic compounds. Guided inquiry methods are used to explore descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, basic thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture and emphasizes basic techniques such as titration, spectroscopy, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, along with inorganic synthesis and calculator-based experiments. Three lectures, one discussion period and one laboratory each week. High school algebra strongly recommended. Satisfies the general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits]
  • General Chemistry II: CHM-111 (4 credits)

    Focuses on fundamental chemical concepts and principles with emphasis on inorganic compounds. Guided inquiry methods are used to explore descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, basic thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture and emphasizes basic techniques such as titration, spectroscopy, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, along with inorganic synthesis and calculator-based experiments. Three lectures, one discussion period and one laboratory each week. High school algebra strongly recommended. Prerequisites: CHM-110 with a minimum grade of C or permission of chair. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in CHM-111 if the prerequisite CHM-110 was not fulfilled at Notre Dame. [ 4 credits ]
  • Organic Chemistry I: CHM-210 (4 credits)

    Focuses on functional group classification, nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, and spectroscopic analysis with a strong emphasis on reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture material and stresses basic techniques such as distillation, recrystallization, extraction, and chromatography, along with organic synthesis using both macroscale and microscale applications. Laboratory also includes an introduction to organic structure determination using a variety of spectral methods, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Three lectures, one discussion and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHM-110, 111. [4 credits]
  • Organic Chemistry II: CHM-211 (4 credits)

    Focuses on functional group classification, nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, and spectroscopic analysis with a strong emphasis on reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture material and stresses basic techniques such as distillation, recrystallization, extraction, and chromatography, along with organic synthesis using both macroscale and microscale applications. Laboratory also includes an introduction to organic structure determination using a variety of spectral methods, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Three lectures, one discussion and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites for: CHM-210 with a minimum grade of C or permission of chair. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in CHM-211 if the prerequisite CHM-210 was not fulfilled at Notre Dame. [4 credits]
  • Fundamentals of Oral Communication: COM-106 (3 credits)

    Cultivates oral communication skill for non-majors, with emphasis on improving speaking and listening skills. Analyzes factors affecting oral communication with self, in dyads, small groups, the public arena, organizations, mass media, and among members of differing cultural backgrounds. Practical experience in delivering speeches and briefings. Fulfills the general education requirement in oral communication. [3 credits]
  • Interpersonal and Team Communication: COM-201 (3 credits)

    Examines concepts, principles and skills central to interpersonal communication processes. Develops understanding of verbal and nonverbal dimensions of human interaction from both experiential and competency-based approaches. Consideration given to group dynamics. Students write reflective journals and participate in a number of workshop experiences. [3 credits]
  • Organizational Communication: COM-403 (3 credits)

    Studies communication systems, structure, problems and solutions within complex organizations, such as business corporations, governmental agencies, hospitals and schools. Students develop practical plans to improve communication within organizations. [3 credits]
  • Introduction to Microcomputer Applications: CST-130 (3 credits)

    Emphasizes problem-solving skills for all disciplines, such as finding reliable information on the Internet, using spreadsheets to analyze information quantitatively, developing databases to store and retrieve information, creating visual computer presentations to accompany reports and designing Web pages. A final integrated project is required. Course focuses on computer competencies for the non-major. [3 credits]
  • Fundamentals of Information Systems: CST-141 (3 credits)

    Introduces the characteristics and architectures of information systems and their impact on businesses. Explores elements of computer hardware, a variety of software capabilities, telecommunications infrastructure and the system development life cycle. This is the gateway course in the major. [3 credits]
  • Programming Concepts: CST-171 (3 credits)

    Introduces computer programming using a common small business language such as Microsoft Visual Basic. Emphasizes programming structures such as decisions, repetitions, sub procedures, functions, and arrays using structured program design with object-oriented concepts. Students learn to write a variety of program types to meet various business needs. [3 credits]
  • Project Management: CST-355 (3 credits)

    Investigates project management as it applies to the systems development life cycle with an electronic project management tool. Emphasizes resource allocation and sub-project definition. Students will apply theory and principles learned to solutions for practical business problems. Prerequisite: CST-171 or CST-261. [3 credits]
  • Internet Communication: CST-356 (3 credits)

    Examines the advantages and challenges of the Internet for businesses communication. The uses of social media as business tools will be explored. [3 credits]
  • Systems Analysis: CST-385 (3 credits)

    Examines the system life cycle and alternative methodologies, emphasizing techniques of project management, system documentation, logical and physical system specification, system development and installation. Students complete a number of systems design projects. Prerequisite: CST-171 or CST-261. [3 credits]
  • Database Concepts: CST-421 (3 credits)

    Introduces concepts and techniques of structuring, storing and retrieving data. Includes database and database table design, data normalization and introductory SQL programming. This is a project-based course. Prerequisite: CST-385. [3 credits]
  • Introduction to Microeconomics: ECO-212 (3 credits)

    Examines the manner in which prices are determined and limited resources are allocated efficiently through mastery of basic supply and demand. Considers the behavior of producers and consumers under various competitive conditions. Assesses the role of government in responding to market failures. Fulfills general education requirement in social science. [3 credits]
  • Medical Terminology: LCL-333 (3 credits)

    Facilitates the understanding of the Latin and Greek language basis of medical terminology. Instructs the student on the identification of the four common word elements (prefix, suffix, root word and combining vowel), in a medical word in order to understand the medical term as a whole entity. [3 credits] (Offered fall 2016)

  • Elementary Functions: MAT-107 (3 credits)

    Provides preparation for study of calculus, and is also designed for pre-service elementary educators with a strong interest in mathematics. Covers polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their applications. Graphing calculator is used throughout the course. Prerequisite: Strong algebraic background (as evidenced by placement test) or completion of MAT 100 or MAT 103. Fulfills the general education requirement in mathematics. [3 credits]

  • Calculus I: MAT-211 (4 credits)

    Introduces functions, limits, continuity, differential calculus of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as basic integration techniques. Applications are considered throughout the course with an emphasis on the life sciences. Weekly laboratory is an integral part of the course. Graphing calculators used to explore topics covered. Fulfills the general education requirement in mathematics Prerequisite: strong high school algebra background or successful completion of MAT-107. [4 credits]

  • Basic Statistics: MAT-215 (3 credits)

    Introduces the basic ideas of statistics: descriptive statistics, central tendency variability, probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, multinomial experiments, contingency tables and analysis of variance. A statistical software package is used. Designed for students in a variety of fields that rely on regular statistical analysis in decision-making. Fulfills general education requirement in mathematics. Prerequisite: A strong algebraic background (as evidenced by placement test) or successful completion of MAT 100 or MAT 103 is recommended. [3 credits]

  • Medical Ethics: PHL-339 (3 credits)

    Evaluates the traditional foundations of moral theory in the West, with special emphasis on issues in medical ethics. Prerequisites: 200-level philosophy course. Fulfills general education requirements for 300/400-level course and values. [ 3 credits ]
  • General Physics I: PHY-101 (4 credits)

    Studies the fundamental physical laws of nature and their use in understanding natural phenomena. Course provides a knowledge base for study in all areas of science and mathematics. Topics include kinematics, dynamics of motion, Newton's laws, rotational mechanics and conservation of energy and momentum. Development of the concepts of vector algebra and calculus are provided as needed. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory weekly. Fulfills general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits]

  • General Physics II: PHY-102 (4 credits)

    Continues studies of the fundamental physical laws of nature and their use in understanding natural phenomena. Topics include classical wave motion, acoustics, optics, electricity and magnetism. Development of the concepts of vector algebra and calculus are provided as needed. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory weekly. [4 credits]

  • College Physics: PHY-111 (3 credits)

    Provides a survey of the field for students with interests in the health sciences. Topics include mechanics of motion, energy, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear structure, and radioactivity. Fulfills general education requirement in natural science. CAUS only. [3 credits]

  • Introductory Psychology: PSY-101 (4 credits)

    Examines psychology's perspective on human behavior through many human experiences: learning and memory, perception, motivation and emotion, personality, social interaction, normal and abnormal behavior, and human development. Draws from experience and fosters application to the students' own lives. This is a foundational course, and it meets prerequisite requirements for most psychology courses. Fulfills general education requirement in social science. Lecture and lab. [4 credits]

Three-Year Plan

Sample program of study for the radiological sciences major in the Women's College prior to clinical training (required for Radiography, recommended for all modalities). Students should select courses with the assistance of the program coordinator. (See course descriptions for a list of required courses and description of course and program options.)

Fall/Winterim Spring
First Year

General Chemistry I

4

General Chemistry II

4

Calculus I

4

Intro. Psychology

4

Fundamentals of Biology

4

Interpersonal Communication

3

College Writing

3

Professional Communications

3

IDS-100 Perspectives in Education

3

200-level Philosophy

3

[18 credits]

 

[17 credits]

 

Second Year

Organic Chemistry I

4

Organic Chemistry II

4

General Physics I

4

General Physics II

4

Intro. to Biblical Studies

3

Literature

3

BUS302 Principles of Management

3

Business

3

Medical Terminology

3

Intro. to Microcomputer Apps.

3

[17 credits]

 

[17 credits]

 

Third Year

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

4

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

4

Business

3

Business

3

Business

3

Business

3

Medical Ethics

3

300-level Religious Studies

3

Basic Statistics

3

History

3

Physical Education

1

[16 credits]

 

[17 credits]

 

   

What to Expect Studying at Notre Dame of Maryland University

A strong foundation in core concepts and personalized advising for individual goals prepares students to be successful in their desired career paths.

Radiological Sciences Careers

Driven by an aging population and advances in technology, there is a great demand for professionals in this field.

Once you complete all academic and clinical programs, you are qualified to become a licensed medical imaging technologist by passing the national registry exam.

Accreditation