Entry-Level Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)

Major

The Entry-Level Bachelor of Science in Nursing program provides non-nurses a strong foundation in caring science to become reflective caring clinicians in the profession of nursing. Our curriculum emphasizes the mission of the university—striving for intellectual and professional excellence, building inclusive communities, engaging in service to others, and promoting social responsibility.

Program Locations

Nursing Major

All qualified applicants are admitted to the University as nursing majors from day one.

Transfer Students

Sophomore Year

Enter the University in your sophomore year as a nursing major to complete general education requirements, courses in the liberal arts, and all support courses prior to taking junior-level nursing courses.

Junior Year

To enter the University in your junior year, you must apply for acceptance.

Policies

Faculty

Courses

  • Exploring Concepts in Biology: BIO-110 (4 credits)

    Prepares students for a major in biology who would benefit first from a focus on the integration of chemistry and mathematics into their study of biology prior to attempting BIO-111. Students will develop concepts, design experiments and analyze data to solve problems that are situated in various branches of biology. Lecture and lab are combined in two-hour class meetings. Fulfills general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits]
  • Fundamentals of Biology: BIO-111 (4 credits)

    Focuses on the structure and function of the fundamental unit of life, the cell. Examines basic biological molecules, membrane structure and function, basic metabolism, photosynthesis, cellular reproduction, evolution, genetics and introductory systematics. In weekly laboratory exercises, students design and conduct experiments to answer scenario-based questions. Includes independent small-group laboratory research project that culminates in a student research symposium. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory. Designed for students with a strong high school background in biology, chemistry and mathematics. Prerequisite: MSAT greater than department-designated value or BIO-110 with minimum grade of C+, or permission of chair. Fulfills general education requirement in natural sciences. [4 credits]
  • General Microbiology: BIO-253 (4 credits)

    Presents basic concepts of bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology with a special focus on bacteria and viruses. The structure, morphology and genetics of microbes will be investigated, as well as their requirements for and patterns of growth. Other topics will include the human microbiota, mechanisms of pathogenicity, basic host defense mechanisms, antimicrobial chemotherapy and the development of microbial drug resistance. Finally, the epidemiology of infectious diseases, along with the characteristics and methods utilized in the control of classic and emerging pathogens will be addressed. In the laboratory students will learn basic aseptic transfer, staining, and culture techniques required for the isolation, identification and enumeration of microbes and will investigate various factors affecting microbial growth, including antiseptics, disinfectants, and antimicrobial drugs. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Pre-nursing students only. Prerequisites: BIO -111 with a minimum grade of C. [4 credits]

  • Genetics & Genomics for Clinical Practice: BIO-260 (3 credits)

    Considers the basics of molecular and Mendelian genetics and how they apply to human medical conditions. Uses specific examples to demonstrate general principles of human diseases and conditions with genetic causes to demonstrate general principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics. Discusses medical applications of emerging genetic tehnologies. Introduces emerging concepts in the genetic and epigenetic causes of human disease. Pre-nursing students only. Prerequisites: BIO-111 with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. [ 3 credits ]

  • Human Anatomy and Physiology For Nurses I: BIO-281 (4 credits)

    Examines the basic structure and function of the human body. Major topics in BIO 281 include the chemistry of living organisms, cells and tissues, chemical and electrical signaling, skin and protective barriers, bones and joints, muscles, the nervous and endocrine systems, and special senses. This course provides a solid foundation in normal human anatomy and physiology to help the student integrate knowledge gained in lecture with clinical application in laboratory. Laboratory work includes dissection, microscopy, studying models, and experimental demonstration of concepts covered in lecture. Dissection of non-preserved animal specimens is required. This course is designed primarily for students who intend to major in nursing. Prerequisites: BIO-111 with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. [ 4 credits ]

  • Human Anatomy and Physiology for Nurses II: BIO-282 (4 credits)

    Examines the basic structure and function of the human body. Major topics covered in BIO 282 include blood, the cardiovascular system, innate and adaptive immunity, the lymphatic system, the respiratory system, the digestive system, metabolism, the urinary system, the reproductive system, basic genetics, and human development. This course provides a solid foundation in normal human anatomy and physiology to help the student integrate knowledge gained in lecture with clinical application in laboratory. Laboratory work includes dissection, microscopy, studying models, and experimental demonstration of concepts covered in lecture. Dissection of non-preserved animal specimens is required. This course is designed primarily for students who intend to major in nursing. Prerequisites: BIO-281. Students must receive a minimum of C in BIO-281 in order to enroll in BIO-282. [ 4 credits ]

  • Survey of General, Organic and Biochemistry Principles: CHM-108 (4 credits)

    Emphasizes the fundamental principles that form the basis of general inorganic, organic and biochemistry that are pertinent to the health sciences. The following topics are covered: understanding the properties and reactivity of elements and compounds, chemical bonding and structure, chemical equations and calculations, acids/bases and solutions, behavior of gases, identification and reactions of fundamental groups, system of nomenclature and stereochemistry. Course also investigates the properties and reactions of important compounds such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and some pharmaceuticals. Use of practical applications will aid students in understanding chemical problems. Laboratory activities engage students in a variety of chemical experiments that enhance the understanding of lecture topics. Fulfills general education requirement in natural sciences for students in the nursing program. [4 credits]
  • College Writing: ENG-101 (3 credits)

    Provides students with an understanding that clear thinking is fundamental to clear writing. It also demonstrates every stage of the composing process: generating and organizing ideas, prewriting and drafting, critiquing, revising, final editing and proofreading. In addition, students work to accomplish clarity, unity, coherence and emphasis in sentences, in paragraphs, and in the overall structure of an essay. They develop techniques of style and tone toward more fluent and appealing prose and strive to sharpen their analytical, critical and editing skills by interacting with other students about their own writing and about the writing of professionals. Students learn to use standard English and develop a sensitivity to sentence structure and diction and to appreciate effectively written prose and recognize characteristics that make such prose effective. To fulfill the general education requirement in composition a minimum grade of C is required. [3 credits]
  • Spanish Language and Culture for Professionals: LSP-105 (1 credits)

    Enables students to learn basic conversational skills and elemental phrases to better communicate with Spanish-speaking persons. Designed for professionals or volunteers who interact with Hispanic communities in professional settings. The cultural component focuses on the customs, spirituality, communication styles and traditions of Hispanics. This course is an elective and does not fulfill the general education language requirement.  [1 credit] (Offered each semester)

  • Spanish Language and Culture: Part 2: LSP-106 (1 credits)

    Deepens students’ understanding of basic conversational skills and phrases to better communicate with Spanish-speaking persons, building on LSP 105. Designed for professionals or volunteers who interact with Hispanic communities in professional settings. This course is an elective and does not fulfill the general education language requirement.  Prerequisite: LSP 105, LSP 101, 102 or placement test. [1 credit]  (Offered each semester)

  • Spanish Language and Culture for Healthcare Professions: LSP-108 (1 credits)

    Emphasizes listening and speaking skills, building on LSP 106. Stresses using the language in practical, conversational situations in a health care setting, as well as drawing on the needs and experiences of the participants. A continued cultural and terminological component is woven into every class. It is a follow-up course to LSP 105 and LSP 106. Fulfills the language requirement for nursing students. Prerequisite: LSP 106, LSP 102, 103 or placement test. [1 credit ] (Offered spring 2017)

  • Algebra Applications: MAT-100 (4 credits)

    Combines algebra preparation and applied algebra, designed to develop students' critical thinking and quantitative reasoning skills needed to understand everyday issues. Provides a thorough study of linear equations and functions as well as an exploration of a variety of nonlinear functions. Data analysis and mathematical modeling focus on real world problems from a variety of fields including science, finance and business. Graphing calculator is used throughout the course. Students meet five times a week in 50-minute classes. Satisfactory completion is a prerequisite for MAT-215, Statistics or MAT-107, Elementary Functions. Available to Women's College students only.  Satisfies the general education requirement in mathematics. [ 4 credits ]

  • Applied Algebra: MAT-103 (3 credits)

    Focuses on fundamental algebraic concepts and the solution of real world problems through the use of basic mathematical models. Provides a thorough study of linear functions as well as an exploration of a variety of nonlinear functions. Data analysis and mathematical modeling focus on real world problems from a variety of fields including science, finance and business. Graphing calculator is used throughout the course. Intended for students of science, finance and business who have limited algebraic skills. The course may be taken to prepare for MAT-107 Elementary Functions or MAT-215 Basic Statistics. Prerequisite: minimum of ne year of high school algebra. Satisfies the general education requirement in mathematics. [3 credits]

  • Elementary Functions: MAT-107 (3 credits)

    Provides preparation for study of calculus, and is also designed for pre-service elementary educators with a strong interest in mathematics. Covers polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their applications. Graphing calculator is used throughout the course. Prerequisite: Strong algebraic background (as evidenced by placement test) or completion of MAT 100 or MAT 103. Fulfills the general education requirement in mathematics. [3 credits]

  • Basic Statistics: MAT-215 (3 credits)

    Introduces the basic ideas of statistics: descriptive statistics, central tendency variability, probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, multinomial experiments, contingency tables and analysis of variance. A statistical software package is used. Designed for students in a variety of fields that rely on regular statistical analysis in decision-making. Fulfills general education requirement in mathematics. Prerequisite: A strong algebraic background (as evidenced by placement test) or successful completion of MAT 100 or MAT 103 is recommended. [3 credits]

  • First Year Seminar: NDMU-100 (3 credits)

    First Year Seminar course (formerly Perspectives in Culture and Education - IDS-100)
  • Nutrition for Wellness (online): NUR-250 (3 credits)

    Focuses on the basic principles of nutrition that will support nursing praxis and their application during the human life span in health and disease. Learners are offered the opportunity to explore the assumptions underlying nutrition for individuals of varying cultural backgrounds, stages of development, and across the wellness-illness continuum. The 14-week course will be offered in seven online modules. [3 credits theory (1:1)]

  • Holistic Health Assessment: NUR-301 (4 credits)

    Introduces the student to knowledge and skills essential for holistic health assessment. The psychological, physical, environmental, social, spiritual and genetic components of a health assessment will be applied. The student will practice assessment and interviewing skills in a skills laboratory. The student will analyze both subjective and objective data and document findings in the appropriate format. This course has 2 components: theory (3 credits) and practice (1 credit). Prerequisite: Transition to Professional Practice [4 credits], 8 weeks.

  • Nursing Informatics: NUR-303 (2 credits)

    Students are introduced to online computer applications used in nursing and health care. Students acquire technical skills needed for the application of patient care technologies and competency in information literacy, information management, and information management systems for the purpose of safe, competent and quality patient care. Prerequisite for CAUS students: Facility in Windows operating system and competency in Microsoft Office applications (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) and Internet Explorer; Introduction to Microcomputer Applications or waiver. Prerequisites for Women’s College students: Acceptance to nursing major. For CAUS students, the course is offered during the Winterim semester. For Women’s College students, full Fall and Spring semesters. [2 credits theory 1:1]

  • Healthy Aging: NUR-304 (3 credits)

    Explores the multiple dimensions of aging in America and in global societies. The course focuses on the foundations of healthy, successful aging based on national indicators, as well as the personal definitions and meanings of the older adult. Students will learn to support optimal promotion of health and wellness while exploring the care of who might also be experiencing illness, recovery or the end-of-life. The complex relationships among person-health-nursing-environment will be examined in depth. Prerequisite: Transition to Professional Nursing Practice. [3 credits theory 1:1], 6 weeks

  • Foundations of a Caring Profession: NUR-305 (5 credits)

    Builds upon previous classes in social and physical sciences, humanities, as well as lived experiences that students bring to the discipline of nursing. In this course, students are introduced to the caring profession of nursing through exploration of philosophical underpinnings, contributions from nurse theorists, and concepts of health and healing. Students develop ways of thinking and knowing, ways of being in relationships with self and others, and appreciation of providing technological care, compassion, and comfort to persons, families and communities. Through thoughtful integration of theory and reflective lived practice, students deepen understanding of the meaning of caring necessary for compassionate presence and technological skill in the art and science of professional nursing. Students are invited to a call to care and to a life-long commitment to nursing scholarship. This course has two components: theory (3 credits) and practice (2 credits). Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing major. [5 credits]

  • Pathopharmacology: NUR-310 (4 credits)

    Combines pathophysiology, the study of altered health status, with pharmacology, the study of medications prescribed to prevent, cure or treat pathophysiological conditions. Major health problems will be highlighted with an emphasis on caring for persons across the lifespan and their individual needs. A systems approach will be used to address specific medications, classifications, side effects and interactions with other therapies. Prerequisite: Acceptnce to nursing major. Co-requisites: Foundations of a Caring Profession, Holistic Health Assessment, Nursing Informatics. [4 credits theory (1:1)]

  • Professional Nursing Care of the Adult I: NUR-311 (4 credits)

    Focuses on the integration of caring for adults experiencing commonly occurring health concerns using competencies that are directed toward health promotion, disease prevention and maintenance/restoration of health. Applying specialized knowledge, communication skills and therapeutic interventions, nursing students will develop relationships with patients/families which will foster partnerships directed toward holistic care. Beginning relationships with the intra/interdisciplinary team will be developed. This course has 2 components: theory (2 credits) and practice (2 credits). Prerequisites: Foundations of a Caring Profession, Holistic Health Assessment, Pathopharmacology. [4 credits: theory (2 credits; 1:1) and practice (2 credits; 1:3)]

  • Nursing Care of Children and Families: NUR-312 (4 credits)

    The course focuses on caring with children and adolescents, and their families, who are experiencing physiological and psychosocial alterations in health as well as promoting health and wellness. Students engage in theory based, evidence based reflective nursing practice with children and adolescents in a variety of places to include inpatient pediatric units, outpatient clinics, and home. The course builds upon courses in social and physical sciences, human growth and development, humanities, and professional nursing care and offers opportunities to reflect on ethical issues concerning children and adolescents. This course has two components: theory (2 credits, 30 hours) and practice (2 credits, 90 hours).  Prerequisite courses: NUR 305 – Foundations of a Caring Profession; NUR 410 Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing.

  • Contemporary Nursing Trends and Theory: NUR-406 (3 credits)

    The course focuses on the use of nursing theory in nursing practice, and on the contemporary challenges of providing and ensuring quality nursing care within the healthcare context. Students explore issues and trends in nursing and healthcare today, including current professional, legal, and ethical standards. Prerequisites: Transition to Professional Nursing Practice, Medical Ethics. [3 credits theory 1:1], 6 weeks

  • Nursing Research: NUR-407 (3 credits)

    Introduces students to knowledge and skills that are essential for a consumer of nursing research. Examines use of the research process as a method to enhance scientific inquiry and to develop a knowledge base for nursing practice. Critical appraisal of both qualitative and quantitative methods in published nursing research is emphasized. Includes interpretation of basic descriptive and inferential statistics in published studies and evaluation of studies for nursing practice. Prerequisites: Transition to Professional Nursing Practice, Basic Statistics. [3 credits theory 1:1], 7 weeks

  • Maternal and Infant Nursing: NUR-408 (4 credits)

    Focuses on holistic caring of childbearing families during pregnancy, labor and delivery, post-partum as well as care of the newborn. Students learn and apply evidence-based nursing theoretical concepts in the nursing care of women, newborns and families in a variety of environments. The course builds upon courses in social and physical sciences, humanities and professional nursing care and provides opportunities for clinical ethical reflection. This course has two components: theory (2 credits) and practice (2 credits). Prerequisites: Holistic Health Assessment, Foundations of a Caring Profession, Pathopharmacology, Professional Nursing Care of the Adult I, Human Growth and Development. [4 credits : theory (2 credits; 1:1) and practice (2 credits; 3:1)]

  • Professional Nursing Care of the Adult II: NUR-409 (4 credits)

    Builds on concepts from NUR-311 in caring for adults experiencing complex health concerns using competencies related to health, illness, dying and death. Nursing students will apply advanced levels of knowledge, communication and interventions as they support patients/families experiencing more severe alterations in health. Relationships with intra/interdisciplinary team members will be integrated into individual nursing practice. This course has two components: theory (2 credits) and practice (2 credits). Prerequisites: All 300-level nursing courses, NUR-410 Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing, and NUR-407 Nursing Research. [4 credits]

     

  • Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing: NUR-410 (4 credits)

    NUR-410 Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing provides opportunities for students to increase understanding and demonstrate appropriate professional nursing care for persons who are experiencing struggles in human living and major psychiatric/mental health problems. Through directed readings, reflective writing, patient teaching, classroom conversations and engagement with patients in clinical settings, students focus on coming to understand what it is like to live through selected mental health states such as depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, schizophrenia, psychoactive substance use disorders and more. Emphasis on the lived experiences of persons with psychiatric illness and a focus on reflection allows students to enrich ways of 'being-with' patients by integrating knowledge of psychobiology, pharmacology, and thoughtful, competent, caring and ethical psychiatric/mental health nursing practice. This course has two components: theory (2 credits) and practice (2 credits). Prerequisites (Fall 2015): All 300-level nursing courses, NUR-407 Nursing Research. [4 credits]; Prerequisites (Spring 2016): NUR-301, NUR-305, NUR-310, NUR-311; Corequisites (Spring 2016): NUR-304, NUR-311, NUR-407.

  • Community Health Nursing: NUR-431 (5 credits)

    Analyzes selected public health and nursing models for community health nursing practice in culturally diverse environments. Students explore specific issues and societal concerns that affect global and public health, including health care needs of vulnerable communities and populations at risk. Students are guided to develop intercultural competence through a series of activities and projects throughout the course. Students assess community health needs and implement strategies, as appropriate, to support health system integrity. A reflection on nursing care of communities as social justice is explored. Community health nurses' contributions to the health of populations and their role in governmental-legislative activities are examined. Prerequisites: Transition to Professional Nursing Practice, Nursing Research. [5 credits] This course has 2 components: theory (3 credits= 24 hours) and practice (2 credits = 32 hours); 8 weeks

  • Caring Nursing Leadership: NUR-432 (3 credits)

    Integrates previously learned nursing knowledge and skills with contemporary leadership and management theories, enabling students to more clearly define their roles as baccalaureate-prepared nurses. Students analyze the transition process to professional nursing practice opportunities for continued professional development, and leadership/management challenges created by increasingly complex health care environments. Prerequisite: Transition to Professional Nursing practice, Nursing Research; ideally, Nursing Leadership is the last course. [3 credits theory 1:1]; 6 weeks

  • Clinical Practicum: NUR-461 (6 credits)

    Engages students in comprehensive clinical practice with patients in a variety of practice settings. Opportunities are provided for students to assume responsibility, in the context of theory-based, evidence-based reflective practice, for the holistic care of assigned patients in a select health care setting. With the guidance of a preceptor who is on staff in the facility, the student collaborates with all members of the health care team in the planning and care of her patients and transitions from nursing student to entry-level professional nurse. Practice settings include, but are not limited to, care of persons in emergency departments, medical-surgical units, homeless shelters, outpatient clinics, critical care units, and labor and delivery units. The focus of the practicum is on intentionally bringing together knowledge and understanding of pathophysiology, social justice, ways of being in relationship with self and others, and excellence in technological caring—toward compassionate, transformative care with persons, families and communities. 225 hours of clinical practice.

    Seminar sessions will provide opportunities for students to bring forward experiences from their senior clinical practica for critical inquiry—leading toward problem-solving and holistic, creative compassionate approaches to caring with patients. With a focus on scholarly and clinical excellence, students are guided to deepen understanding of persons, families and groups entrusted to their care. During this seminar, students engage in deepening understanding of their patients and clinical work through the lens of nursing theory, research, ethics and critical exploration of the lived experiences of their patients. Seminar topics include contemporary clinical practice concerns in a context of theory-based, reflective, evidence-based practice. Additionally, the course offers opportunities for students to reflect on self and engage in meaning-making during this time of transition from nursing student to professional nurse. Prerequisites: Maternal and Infant Nursing, Professional Nursing Care of the Adult II, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing, Nursing Care of Children and Families, Nursing Research, Contemporary Trends and Theory and all 300-level courses. Must be taken concurrently with Caring Nursing Leadership. [6 credits: clinical credits; 1:3, 225 hours]

  • Introduction to Philosophy: PHL-201 (3 credits)

    Studies some of the major issues that have intrigued reflective people from time immemorial: How do we know? What is human nature? Is there life after death? Where did the universe originate? We will evaluate replies suggested from the time of Plato to the 20th century. Fulfills general education requirement for 200-level course. [ 3 credits ]
  • Medical Ethics: PHL-339 (3 credits)

    Evaluates the traditional foundations of moral theory in the West, with special emphasis on issues in medical ethics. Prerequisites: 200-level philosophy course. Fulfills general education requirements for 300/400-level course and values. [ 3 credits ]
  • Introductory Psychology: PSY-101 (4 credits)

    Examines psychology's perspective on human behavior through many human experiences: learning and memory, perception, motivation and emotion, personality, social interaction, normal and abnormal behavior, and human development. Draws from experience and fosters application to the students' own lives. This is a foundational course, and it meets prerequisite requirements for most psychology courses. Fulfills general education requirement in social science. Lecture and lab. [4 credits]
  • Human Growth and Development: PSY-233 (3 credits)

    Explores the principles of developmental psychology from infancy through adulthood and includes general consideration of developmental tasks through the lifespan. Prerequisite: PSY-101. [3 credits]
  • Introduction to Biblical Studies: RST-201 (3 credits)

    Introduces the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures of the Judeo-Christian tradition, exploring their historical and literary contexts, as well as interpretations of religious meaning. Presents modern methods of biblical study, including Roman Catholic, Protestant and Jewish scholarship. Fulfills general education requirement for 200-level religious studies. [3 credits]
  • American Catholicism: RST-300 (3 credits)

    Studies Roman Catholicism in the United States. Topics include the history of American Catholic self-understanding; the influence of the Catholic Church on politics, education and social issues; and an examination of American Catholic socio-religious issues. Prerequisite: RST-201. Fulfills general education requirement for 300/400-level religious studies. [ 3 credits ]
  • Introductory Sociology: SOC-101 (3 credits)

    Uses the sociological imagination to help explain what sociology is and how it is relevant to everyday life. Examines culture, social structure, socialization, social institutions, social inequality and social change. Topics include gender roles, deviance and social control, class, race and ethnic inequality, family, and work. Serves as a foundation course for students interested in the field of sociology and criminology. Fulfills general education requirement in social science. [3 credits]

Four-Year Plan

Students must select courses with the assistance of a faculty advisor. The program of study requires a total of 121 to 129 credits.

Fall Spring
First Year
*MAT-100 Algebraic Applications OR 4 CHM-108 Survey of General, Organic & Biochemistry 4
*MAT-103 Applied Algebra (unless waived) 3 BIO-253 Microbiology 4
NDMU-100 First Year Seminar 3 ENG English Literature 3
ENG-101 College Writing 3 PHL-201 Introduction to Philosophy 3
BIO-111 Fundamentals of Biology 4 PSY-101 Introductory Psychology 4
HIS History Requirement 3 [18 credits]  
[13/17 credits]      
Second Year
BIO-260 Genetics and Genomics for Clinical Practice 3 BIO-282 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4
NUR-250 Nutrition for Wellness (Online) 3 SOC-101 Introductory Sociology 3
PHL-339 Medical Ethics 3 PSY-233 Human Growth & Development 3
BIO-281 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 MAT-215 Basic Statistics 3
RST-201 Introduction to Biblical Studies 3 RST-300/400 Upper Level RST Course Requirement 3
LSP-105 Spanish Language & Culture for Professionals I (unless waived) 1 LSP-106 Spanish Language & Culture for Professionals II (unless waived) 1
[16/17 credits]   [16/17 credits]  
Third Year
NUR-301 Holistic Health Assessment 4 NUR-304 Healthy Aging 3
NUR-303 Nursing Informatics 2 NUR-311 Professional Nursing Care of the Adult I 4
NUR-305 Foundations of a Caring Profession 5 NUR-407 Nursing Research 3
NUR-310 Pathopharmacology 4 NUR-410 Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing 4
[15 credits]   [14 credits]  
Fourth Year
NUR-312 Nursing Care of Children and Families 4 LSP-108 Spanish Language & Culture for Healthcare Professionals 1
NUR-406 Contemporary Trends and Theory in Nursing 3 NUR-431 Community Health Nursing 5
NUR-408 Maternal and Infant Nursing 4 NUR-432 Caring Nursing Leadership 3
NUR-409 Professional Nursing Care of the Adult II 4 NUR-461 Clinical Practicum 6
[15 credits]   [15 credits]  
Total General Education Credits: 61/66
Total Nursing Credits: 61
[122/127 total credits]

Additional Curriculum Information

Gender and Cross-Cultural Studies General Education Requirements

In addition to the general education requirements listed in the curriculum, all NDMU students must satisfy a Gender Studies requirement and a Cross-Cultural Studies Requirement.   

Students who take both MAT-100/103 and BIO-110, will need to fit a general education requirement into a winterim or summer semester (these students will meet with their advisor to make a plan for completing the requirement).

*Math Requirement

If pre-nursing students place into MAT-100 Algebraic Applications on the math placement test, then they are required to take MAT-100. If pre-nursing students place into MAT-103 Applied Algebra, then they are required to take MAT-103. 

However, if they place into MAT 107 or higher, then MAT-103 may be waived.

General Biology Requirement

BIO-111 General Biology requires permission of instructor to take without BIO-110 Exploring Concepts of Biology as a pre-requisite  course.

◊Foreign Language Requirement for Nursing Majors Only

LSP-108 Spanish Language & Culture for Healthcare Professionals is a requirement of the nursing major. Students will take a Spanish placement test that determines whether or not LSP-105 Spanish Language & Culture for Professionals I and/or LSP-106 Spanish Language & Culture for Professionals II is required to take prior to LSP-108.

If students place into LSP-105 on the placement test, then they are required to take LSP-105, LSP-106 and LSP-108. If students place into LSP-106 on the placement test, then they are required to take LSP-106 and LSP-108. If students place into LSP-108 on the placement test, then they are required to take LSP-108 only.

Updated May 2016

What to Expect Studying at Notre Dame of Maryland University

Small class sizes, faculty mentoring, and hands-on experiences offer an environment of individualized learning while clinicals, service-learning, and study abroad provide opportunities to transform the world.

Program Accreditation

Alum
Jane Lebherz
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What's Next: Johns Hopkins Hospital - Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Alum, NDMU Class of 2017 Entry-Level Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)

Since beginning my college experience at Notre Dame, I have been willed to step out of my comfort zone continuously. The courage that it takes to move out of my comfort zone will follow me into my Registered Nurse position on the NICU as I care for some of the tiniest, most unstable patients the hospital holds.

Read story

Research & Internship Opportunities

As a nursing student, you will have research opportunities both in the classroom and in clinical practice.

  • Nursing Research, a required course for all students, includes a service-learning component.
  • During your Clinical Practicum, you will have an opportunity to create a Transformational Practice Project which can be presented at our annual BSN symposium and at Nancy Kreiter Student Research Day.

In Nursing, we teach the value of advocacy; advocacy for patients and their families. Research assignments are often built on this outcome and the School of Nursing’s mission overall.

Clinical Experiences

You will have an opportunity to gain experience in a clinical setting at the start of your junior year and you will take courses with a clinical component every semester from that point forward. 

In clinicals, you will have a chance to apply concepts learned in the classroom by working with patients and their families under the supervision of a clinical instructor.

Clinical Sites Include
Simulation Labs

In addition to clinical sites, you will also spend time in our state of the art simulation labs which allow you to practice your response to realistic medical situations in a safe environment.

Study Abroad

You may choose to participate in a mission trip to Haiti as part of the Community Health Clinical Experience.

Study Abroad