Engineering

Major

5-year Program

The integrated dual-degree Engineering program provides a broad knowledge of the liberal arts and sciences with opportunities to develop professional experience in a selected field of engineering.

Program Locations

Available Majors

  • Dual Degree: Chemical or Materials Science & Engineering and Chemistry
  • Dual Degree: Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry

You will spend 3-4 years at Notre Dame fulfilling general education requirements and completing advanced work in a major for the Bachelor of Arts degree, such as chemistry, computer science, mathematics, or physics.

Then, you will continue your education for 2-3 years to complete the requirements of a Bachelor of Science degree at either:

Note: Admission to engineering schools is competitive and is not guaranteed.

Available Programs

Columbia University

  • Applied Mathematics or Physics
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Computer Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Earth and Environmental Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Engineering Mechanics
  • IEOR: Industrial Engineering, Management Systems, or Operations Research
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

Johns Hopkins University

  • Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Computer Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Materials Science & Engineering
  • Engineering Mechanics
  • Mechanical Engineering

Additional Study Options

  • Five-Year Program

Courses

  • General Chemistry I: CHM-110 (4 credits)

    Focuses on fundamental chemical concepts and principles with emphasis on inorganic compounds. Guided inquiry methods are used to explore descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, basic thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture and emphasizes basic techniques such as titration, spectroscopy, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, along with inorganic synthesis and calculator-based experiments. Three lectures, one discussion period and one laboratory each week. High school algebra strongly recommended. Satisfies the general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits]
  • General Chemistry II: CHM-111 (4 credits)

    Focuses on fundamental chemical concepts and principles with emphasis on inorganic compounds. Guided inquiry methods are used to explore descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, basic thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture and emphasizes basic techniques such as titration, spectroscopy, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, along with inorganic synthesis and calculator-based experiments. Three lectures, one discussion period and one laboratory each week. High school algebra strongly recommended. Prerequisites: CHM-110 with a minimum grade of C or permission of chair. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in CHM-111 if the prerequisite CHM-110 was not fulfilled at Notre Dame. [ 4 credits ]
  • Programming Concepts: CST-171 (3 credits)

    Introduces computer programming using a common small business language such as Microsoft Visual Basic. Emphasizes programming structures such as decisions, repetitions, sub procedures, functions, and arrays using structured program design with object-oriented concepts. Students learn to write a variety of program types to meet various business needs. [3 credits]
  • C++ Object-Oriented Programming: CST-295 (3 credits)

    Introduces object-oriented programming including objects, classes, inheritance and polymorphism. Includes high-level structures such as pointers and arrays as well as data structures with stacks and queues. Prerequisite: CST-171 or MAT-211. [3 credits]
  • Introduction to Microeconomics: ECO-212 (3 credits)

    Examines the manner in which prices are determined and limited resources are allocated efficiently through mastery of basic supply and demand. Considers the behavior of producers and consumers under various competitive conditions. Assesses the role of government in responding to market failures. Fulfills general education requirement in social science. [3 credits]
  • College Writing: ENG-101 (3 credits)

    Provides students with an understanding that clear thinking is fundamental to clear writing. It also demonstrates every stage of the composing process: generating and organizing ideas, prewriting and drafting, critiquing, revising, final editing and proofreading. In addition, students work to accomplish clarity, unity, coherence and emphasis in sentences, in paragraphs, and in the overall structure of an essay. They develop techniques of style and tone toward more fluent and appealing prose and strive to sharpen their analytical, critical and editing skills by interacting with other students about their own writing and about the writing of professionals. Students learn to use standard English and develop a sensitivity to sentence structure and diction and to appreciate effectively written prose and recognize characteristics that make such prose effective. To fulfill the general education requirement in composition a minimum grade of C is required. [3 credits]
  • Calculus I: MAT-211 (4 credits)

    Introduces functions, limits, continuity, differential calculus of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as basic integration techniques. Applications are considered throughout the course with an emphasis on the life sciences. Weekly laboratory is an integral part of the course. Graphing calculators used to explore topics covered. Fulfills the general education requirement in mathematics Prerequisite: strong high school algebra background or successful completion of MAT-107. [4 credits]

  • Calculus II: MAT-212 (4 credits)

    Studies trigonometric functions, integration by parts and tables, improper integrals, functions of two variables, partial derivatives, double integrals, differential equations, geometric and power series, basic convergence tests, Taylor polynomials and series, and Fourier polynomials and series. Applications are considered throughout the course with an emphasis on the life sciences. Weekly laboratory is an integral part of the course. Graphing calculator is used to explore topics covered. Prerequisite: Calculus I or placement into MAT-212. [4 credits]

  • Calculus III: MAT-213 (3 credits)

    Covers visualization of functions of two variables, contour graphs, vector geometry, partial derivatives, gradient vector, directional derivatives, constrained optimization, double integral in rectangular and polar coordinates, triple integrals in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Applications are considered throughout the course. Mathematica is used to explore topics covered. Prerequisite: Calculus II or placement into MAT-213. [3 credits]

  • Calculus of Vector Fields: MAT-214 (1 credits)

    Analyzes parametric curves and surfaces, vector fields, line integrals and their applications, the Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals, Green's Theorem, flux integrals, divergence and curl, Stokes' Theorem and the Divergence Theorem. Mathematica is used to explore topics covered. Prerequisite: Calculus III. [1 credit]

  • Differential Equations: MAT-315 (3 credits)

    Introduces the solution, applications and theory of ordinary differential equations. Topics include: solutions of differential equations, initial value problems, boundary value problems, Laplace transforms and series solutions. Prerequisite: MAT-212. [3 credits]

  • General Physics I: PHY-101 (4 credits)

    Studies the fundamental physical laws of nature and their use in understanding natural phenomena. Course provides a knowledge base for study in all areas of science and mathematics. Topics include kinematics, dynamics of motion, Newton's laws, rotational mechanics and conservation of energy and momentum. Development of the concepts of vector algebra and calculus are provided as needed. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory weekly. Fulfills general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits]

  • General Physics II: PHY-102 (4 credits)

    Continues studies of the fundamental physical laws of nature and their use in understanding natural phenomena. Topics include classical wave motion, acoustics, optics, electricity and magnetism. Development of the concepts of vector algebra and calculus are provided as needed. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory weekly. [4 credits]

  • Modern Physics: PHY-201 (3 credits)

    Traces the development of ideas and theories that have shaped physics in the last 100 years. Topics include relativity, quantum theory, atomic and nuclear structure, particle physics and cosmology. Course can be used to fulfill minor in physics. Prerequisites: PHY-102 and MAT-212. [3 credits]

Five-Year Plan

Sample program of study for the dual-degree physics/engineering major. Students should select courses with the assistance of a faculty advisor.

See course descriptions for a list of required courses and description of course and program options.

Fall Spring
First Year
PHY-101 General Physics I 4 PHY-102 General Physics II 4
MAT-211 Calculus I 4 MAT-212 Calculus II 4
General Education/Elective 3 CST-171 Programming Concepts or MAT-243 Linear Algebra 3
ENG-101 College Writing 3 Foreign Language 3
IDS-100 Perspectives in Education 3 General Education 3
[17 credits]   [17 credits]  
Second Year
PHY-201 Modern Physics 3 PH 316L Classical Mechanics* 3
General Education/Elective 3 MAT-315 Differential Equations or elective 3
MAT-213 Calculus III 3 CHM-111 General Chemistry II 4
CHM-110 General Chemistry I 4 CST-171 Programming Concepts or MAT-243 Linear Algebra 3
ECO-212 Principles of Microeconomics 3 MAT-214 Calculus of Vector Fields 1
Physical Education 1 General Ed 3
[17 credits]   [17 credits]  
Third Year
PH 415L Quantum Mechanics I *3 PHY/MAT/CSC/EGR 300/400 level 3
PH 417L Electricity and Magnetism *3 PHY/MAT/CSC/EGR 300/400 level 3
PHY/MAT/CSC/EGR 300/400 level 3 General Education/Electives 9
General Education/Electives 6 [15 credits]  
[15 credits]      
Fourth and Fifth Year: Engineering School
Courses to be determined by program and school chosen

Notes

  • Students interested in specific engineering fields should consult with program coordinator for course suggestions when choosing physics, mathematics, computer science or engineering courses at the 300/400-level.
  • Courses with a designation of "L" are taught at Loyola. Notre Dame students take the courses through the cooperative program. For more information, contact the program coordinator.
  • Winterim sessions should be reserved for general education courses or possibly an internship.
  • See individual program sections for course descriptions.

What to Expect Studying at Notre Dame of Maryland University

Small classes, lectures and seminars explore current trends and provide a climate for individualized learning.

Research & Internship Opportunities

Examples of internship or employment opportunities include:

Engineering Careers

  • Aerospace Engineer
  • Biomedical Engineer
  • Chemical Engineer
  • Civil Engineer
  • Computer Hardware Engineer
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Industrial Engineer
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Nuclear Engineer