Chemistry

Major/Minor

The Chemistry program offers a solid foundation in chemical principles and introduces the techniques and practices of modern chemistry through hands-on laboratory experience. Opportunities for original student research and creative experimentation facilitated by faculty are encouraged.

Program Locations

Available Majors

  • Chemistry

Available Minors

  • Chemistry

Additional Study Options

Faculty

Courses

  • Fundamentals of Biology: BIO-111 (4 credits)

    Focuses on the structure and function of the fundamental unit of life, the cell. Examines basic biological molecules, membrane structure and function, basic metabolism, photosynthesis, cellular reproduction, evolution, genetics and introductory systematics. In weekly laboratory exercises, students design and conduct experiments to answer scenario-based questions. Includes independent small-group laboratory research project that culminates in a student research symposium. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory. Designed for students with a strong high school background in biology, chemistry and mathematics. Prerequisite: MSAT greater than department-designated value or BIO-110 with minimum grade of C+, or permission of chair. Fulfills general education requirement in natural sciences. [4 credits]
  • General Chemistry I: CHM-110 (4 credits)

    Focuses on fundamental chemical concepts and principles with emphasis on inorganic compounds. Guided inquiry methods are used to explore descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, basic thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture and emphasizes basic techniques such as titration, spectroscopy, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, along with inorganic synthesis and calculator-based experiments. Three lectures, one discussion period and one laboratory each week. High school algebra strongly recommended. Satisfies the general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits]
  • General Chemistry II: CHM-111 (4 credits)

    Focuses on fundamental chemical concepts and principles with emphasis on inorganic compounds. Guided inquiry methods are used to explore descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, basic thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture and emphasizes basic techniques such as titration, spectroscopy, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, along with inorganic synthesis and calculator-based experiments. Three lectures, one discussion period and one laboratory each week. High school algebra strongly recommended. Prerequisites: CHM-110 with a minimum grade of C or permission of chair. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in CHM-111 if the prerequisite CHM-110 was not fulfilled at Notre Dame. [ 4 credits ]
  • Organic Chemistry I: CHM-210 (4 credits)

    Focuses on functional group classification, nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, and spectroscopic analysis with a strong emphasis on reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture material and stresses basic techniques such as distillation, recrystallization, extraction, and chromatography, along with organic synthesis using both macroscale and microscale applications. Laboratory also includes an introduction to organic structure determination using a variety of spectral methods, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Three lectures, one discussion and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHM-110, 111. [4 credits]
  • Organic Chemistry II: CHM-211 (4 credits)

    Focuses on functional group classification, nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, and spectroscopic analysis with a strong emphasis on reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Laboratory is coordinated with lecture material and stresses basic techniques such as distillation, recrystallization, extraction, and chromatography, along with organic synthesis using both macroscale and microscale applications. Laboratory also includes an introduction to organic structure determination using a variety of spectral methods, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Three lectures, one discussion and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites for: CHM-210 with a minimum grade of C or permission of chair. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in CHM-211 if the prerequisite CHM-210 was not fulfilled at Notre Dame. [4 credits]
  • Physical Chemistry I: CHM-301 (4 credits)

    Provides a detailed view and in-depth analysis of the following topics: physicochemical properties of matter in the gaseous, liquid, and solid states; kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions; behavior of solutions; phase equilibria; electrochemistry; introductory-level quantum mechanics; computational chemistry; atomic and molecular structure; and spectroscopy. The relationship between microscopic structure and macroscopic behavior of matter is explored in laboratory activities and characterized in mathematical terms. Three lectures, one four-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites: CHM-211, MAT-211 and 212 with minimum grade of C. Permission of instructor if prerequisites are not satisfied. [4 credits]
  • Physical Chemistry II: CHM-302 (4 credits)

    Provides a detailed view and in-depth analysis of the following topics: physicochemical properties of matter in the gaseous, liquid, and solid states; kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions; behavior of solutions; phase equilibria; electrochemistry; introductory-level quantum mechanics; computational chemistry; atomic and molecular structure; and spectroscopy. The relationship between microscopic structure and macroscopic behavior of matter is explored in laboratory activities and characterized in mathematical terms. Three lectures, one four-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites: CHM-301 with minimum grade of C. Permission of instructor if prerequisites are not satisfied. [4 credits]
  • Analytical Chemistry: CHM-303 (4 credits)

    Examines principles and practices of quantitative analysis as applied to gravimetric, volumetric, electrochemical and instrumental methods. Emphasizes acid-base, precipitation, redox and complexation chemistry. Statistical methods are used to evaluate the precision and accuracy of data and results. Covers laboratory determinations of representative chemical compounds and use of proper techniques and laboratory practices. Three lectures, one four-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite: CHM-110, 111 or equivalent with a minimum of C or permission of instructor. [4 credits]
  • Instrumental Analysis: CHM-305 (4 credits)

    Examines principles and practices of analytical chemistry using instrumentation. Includes spectroscopic, chromatographic and electrometric techniques. Topics covered include visible, ultraviolet, infrared and atomic spectroscopies; gas and liquid chromatographies; potentiometric, voltammetric and polarographic methods; nuclear magnetic and mass spectrometries; and computer simulations. Analysis of data and presentation of results in journal article format are important features of the course. (Analysis graphics and spreadsheet software are used for this activity.) Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites: CHM-210 and CHM-303 with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. [4 credits]
  • Survey of Biochemistry: CHM-325 (4 credits)

    Provides an overview of biochemistry. Includes the study of proteins, enzymatic mechanisms and kinetics, energy production, and basic metabolic pathways. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: CHM-211 with minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. [ 4 credits ]
  • Chemical Literature: CHM-350 (1 credits)

    Designed to familiarize the student with technical writings, peer-review of publications, the major reference works and journals of chemistry, and to develop skills in effective use of the literature. The course covers effective use of chemistry reference works, databases, abstracts and journals; strategies for online searches; construction and use of bibliographies; proficient use of computer technology and software; analysis and evaluation of chemistry literature. Students use online searching of Chemical Abstracts and other electronic databases via computer and engage in information retrieval using a variety of sources and the Internet. One meeting per week; significant number of out-of-class task-oriented assignments. Co-requisite: 300- or 400-level CHM course or permission of instructor. [1 credit]
  • Advanced Topics in Chemistry: CHM-401 (4 credits)

    Explores a variety of topics within the chemical sciences and related interdisciplinary subjects. New/rapidly emerging areas of chemistry are studied and other important topics that emerge in other chemistry courses are explored in more detail and integrated into new areas. Topics may include heterocyclic chemistry, green chemistry, atomic probe microscopy and nanoscience, materials chemistry and nanotechnology, interface analysis and surface science, chemistry and art, molecular modeling, and bioanalytical chemistry. Group activities promote interpretation and synthesis of complex chemical opics. Three meetings and one discussion session per week; laboratory activities are included. Prerequisite: A 300-level CHM lab course with minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. [4 credits]
  • Chemical Research I: CHM-407 (2 credits)

    Conducts original laboratory research investigating a topic in the chemical sciences. Includes preliminary literature study, design and execution of experimental work along with presentation of results in written and oral formats. Includes a significant amount of laboratory work each week (six to eight hours), written progress reports and weekly conferences. Junior/senior standing in the major. Admission by permission of faculty member and department chair. Course may not be used for the liberal arts major or for a chemistry minor. [2-4 credits]
  • Chemical Research II: CHM-408 (2 credits)

    Conducts original laboratory research investigating a topic in the chemical sciences. Includes preliminary literature study, design and execution of experimental work along with presentation of results in written and oral formats. Includes a significant amount of laboratory work each week (six to eight hours), written progress reports and weekly conferences. Junior/senior standing in the major. Admission by permission of faculty member and department chair. Course may not be used for the liberal arts major or for a chemistry minor. [2-4 credits]
  • Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: CHM-411 (4 credits)

    Focuses on in-depth study of the physical and chemical properties of inorganic compounds, with emphasis on structure and bonding and reference to molecular modeling. Explores properties and reactions of the elements, ionic and covalent bonding, acid-base theories, solid-state chemistry, descriptive chemistry of transition metals, and the chemistry of coordination compounds and bioinorganic compounds. Develops professional communication skills through a research paper, peer review and presentations. Laboratory includes synthesis and analysis of coordination compounds, using microscale, macroscale and instrumental techniques. Three lectures, one discussion and one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: CHM-301 or permission of instructor. [4 credits ]
  • Biochemistry I: CHM-425 (4 credits)

    Focuses on biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, the biochemistry of energy production, nucleic acids, and a description of basic metabolic pathways and their integration in functioning organisms. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory each week. Prerequisites: BIO-111, CHM-211 with minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. [4 credits]
  • Biochemistry II: CHM-426 (4 credits)

    Focuses on biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, the biochemistry of energy production, nucleic acids, and a description of basic metabolic pathways and their integration in functioning organisms. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory each week. Prerequisites: CHM-425 with minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. [4 credits]
  • Chemistry Seminar: CHM-450 (1 credits)

    Includes presentations about internship experiences, laboratory research and literature findings of current topics in chemistry. In this capstone course, students learn to construct and deliver effective technical presentations. Students attend chemistry seminars or professional meetings given at area institutions as part of this course. Evaluations and summaries of talks are required. Students give a formal presentation to faculty, guests and students during the department's Spring Seminar Series. One meeting per week. Prerequisite: chemistry major; CHM-350. [1 credit]
  • Independent Study in Chemistry: CHM-463 (1 credits)

    Emphasis is on individual study of a specified chemistry topic under the direction of a faculty member. Choice of topic is made in consultation with the student's major advisor and is selected to meet a specific programmatic need. Topics may include medicinal or pharmaceutical chemistry, forensic chemistry or industrial chemistry. Includes significant literature review and study. Laboratory work may be required. Presentation of findings in written and oral formats. Includes significant work each week, written progress reports and weekly conferences. Permission of department chair required. May not be used to satisfy the liberal arts major. [Variable credits (1-4) with typically 3-4]
  • Fundamentals of Oral Communication: COM-106 (3 credits)

    Cultivates oral communication skill for non-majors, with emphasis on improving speaking and listening skills. Analyzes factors affecting oral communication with self, in dyads, small groups, the public arena, organizations, mass media, and among members of differing cultural backgrounds. Practical experience in delivering speeches and briefings. Fulfills the general education requirement in oral communication. [3 credits]
  • C++ Object-Oriented Programming: CST-295 (3 credits)

    Introduces object-oriented programming including objects, classes, inheritance and polymorphism. Includes high-level structures such as pointers and arrays as well as data structures with stacks and queues. Prerequisite: CST-171 or MAT-211. [3 credits]
  • College Writing: ENG-101 (3 credits)

    Provides students with an understanding that clear thinking is fundamental to clear writing. It also demonstrates every stage of the composing process: generating and organizing ideas, prewriting and drafting, critiquing, revising, final editing and proofreading. In addition, students work to accomplish clarity, unity, coherence and emphasis in sentences, in paragraphs, and in the overall structure of an essay. They develop techniques of style and tone toward more fluent and appealing prose and strive to sharpen their analytical, critical and editing skills by interacting with other students about their own writing and about the writing of professionals. Students learn to use standard English and develop a sensitivity to sentence structure and diction and to appreciate effectively written prose and recognize characteristics that make such prose effective. To fulfill the general education requirement in composition a minimum grade of C is required. [3 credits]
  • Calculus I: MAT-211 (4 credits)

    Introduces functions, limits, continuity, differential calculus of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as basic integration techniques. Applications are considered throughout the course with an emphasis on the life sciences. Weekly laboratory is an integral part of the course. Graphing calculators used to explore topics covered. Fulfills the general education requirement in mathematics Prerequisite: strong high school algebra background or successful completion of MAT-107. [4 credits]

  • Calculus II: MAT-212 (4 credits)

    Studies trigonometric functions, integration by parts and tables, improper integrals, functions of two variables, partial derivatives, double integrals, differential equations, geometric and power series, basic convergence tests, Taylor polynomials and series, and Fourier polynomials and series. Applications are considered throughout the course with an emphasis on the life sciences. Weekly laboratory is an integral part of the course. Graphing calculator is used to explore topics covered. Prerequisite: Calculus I or placement into MAT-212. [4 credits]

  • Calculus III: MAT-213 (3 credits)

    Covers visualization of functions of two variables, contour graphs, vector geometry, partial derivatives, gradient vector, directional derivatives, constrained optimization, double integral in rectangular and polar coordinates, triple integrals in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Applications are considered throughout the course. Mathematica is used to explore topics covered. Prerequisite: Calculus II or placement into MAT-213. [3 credits]

  • Differential Equations: MAT-315 (3 credits)

    Introduces the solution, applications and theory of ordinary differential equations. Topics include: solutions of differential equations, initial value problems, boundary value problems, Laplace transforms and series solutions. Prerequisite: MAT-212. [3 credits]

  • General Physics I: PHY-101 (4 credits)

    Studies the fundamental physical laws of nature and their use in understanding natural phenomena. Course provides a knowledge base for study in all areas of science and mathematics. Topics include kinematics, dynamics of motion, Newton's laws, rotational mechanics and conservation of energy and momentum. Development of the concepts of vector algebra and calculus are provided as needed. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory weekly. Fulfills general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits]

  • General Physics II: PHY-102 (4 credits)

    Continues studies of the fundamental physical laws of nature and their use in understanding natural phenomena. Topics include classical wave motion, acoustics, optics, electricity and magnetism. Development of the concepts of vector algebra and calculus are provided as needed. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory weekly. [4 credits]

  • Introduction to Astronomy: PHY-155 (3 credits)

    Presents topics in astronomy designed for the non-science student. Describes and traces the historical development of astronomy from ancient myths to modern cosmology. Course concentrates on trying to understand the properties and motion of planets, stars, galaxies and the universe itself. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory weekly. Extensive use of the telescope. Fulfills general education requirement in natural science. [4 credits Women's College; 3 credits College of Adult Undergraduate Studies]

  • Modern Physics: PHY-201 (3 credits)

    Traces the development of ideas and theories that have shaped physics in the last 100 years. Topics include relativity, quantum theory, atomic and nuclear structure, particle physics and cosmology. Course can be used to fulfill minor in physics. Prerequisites: PHY-102 and MAT-212. [3 credits]

  • Introduction to Biblical Studies: RST-201 (3 credits)

    Introduces the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures of the Judeo-Christian tradition, exploring their historical and literary contexts, as well as interpretations of religious meaning. Presents modern methods of biblical study, including Roman Catholic, Protestant and Jewish scholarship. Fulfills general education requirement for 200-level religious studies. [3 credits]

Four-Year Plan

Sample program of study for the chemistry major. Students should select courses with the assistance of a faculty advisor.
See course descriptions for a list of required courses and description of course and program options.

Fall Spring
First Year

IDS-100 Perspectives in Education

3

ENG-101 College Writing 

3

BIO-111 Fundamentals of Biology
(recommended for certain programs)

4

RST-201 Introduction to Biblical Studies

3

CHM-110 General Chemistry

4

CHM-111 General Chemistry II

4

MAT-211 Calculus I

4

MAT-212 Calculus II

4

[15 credits]

 

[14 credits]

 

Second Year

CHM-210 Organic Chemistry

4

CHM-211 Organic Chemistry II

4

PHY-101 Physics I

4

PHY-102 Physics II

4

COM-106 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

3

Religious Studies (300/400)

3

History

3

Philosophy (200)

3

Foreign Language

3

Physical Education

1

 [17 credits]

 

 [15 credits]

 

Third Year

CHM-301 Physical Chemistry I

4

CHM-302 Physical Chemistry II

4

CHM-350 Chemical Literature

1

CHM-401/408/426 Advanced Topics/Research/Biochemistry II

4

CHM-325/407/425 Survey of Biochemistry/Research/Biochemistry I

4

Literature

3

Philosophy (300/400)

3

Fine Arts

3

General Education/Electives

6

General Education/Electives

3

[18 credits]

 

[17 credits]

 

Fourth Year

CHM-303 Analytical Chemistry

4

CHM-305 Instrumental Analysis

4

MAT-213/315, PHY-201 or CST-295

3

CHM-411 Advanced Inorganic

4

Social Science

3

CHM-450 Chemistry Seminar

1

General Education/Electives

6

Electives/Internship

6

[16 credits]

 

[15 credits]

 

What to Expect Studying at Notre Dame of Maryland University

Small classes, lectures and seminars explore current trends and provide a climate for individualized learning.

Student
Erika Deppenschmidt
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What's Next: Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology

Student, NDMU Class of 2017 Chemistry

Notre Dame has fostered my confidence and helped me develop tools and skills to excelling in any circumstance. I am looking forward to success in graduate school and achieving my dreams of becoming a doctor.

Read story

Research & Internship Opportunities

As a chemistry major, you are encouraged to pursue pursue internships, contribute to professional conferences and symposia, attend meetings of the Maryland Section of the American Chemical Society (held on campus and locally), and participate in chemistry department seminars and other events.

Opportunities to present your work include Notre Dame's annual research symposium in April, Nancy Kreiter Student Research Day, and at local and national meetings featuring undergraduate research. 

Examples of Research Opportunities

Faculty-Student Collaborations

  • Jocelyn McKeon and Khara Karpouzie, “Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis: Quantitative Interaction between Flavonoids and Serum Albumin” poster presentation, 2016 Nancy Kreiter Research Day
  • Jocelyn McKeon and Angela Buonaugurio, “Micellar Liquid Chromatography: Affinity Measurements between Sulfonamides and Biomimetic Membranes” poster presentation, St. Joseph University Sigma Xi Research Symposium
  • Jocelyn McKeon and Jessica Sexton, “Ion Chromatography for the Quantitation of Inorganic Ions in Drinking Fountain Water” poster presentation, (University of Maryland, Baltimore County Undergraduate Research Symposium)

We also have special opportunities to work as student lab assistants and in the department’s prep and stockrooms.

Chemistry Careers

We prepare you for employment opportunities in research laboratories, medical and government facilities, pharmaceutical companies and other industries.

Possible Career Opportunities

  • Research
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Biotechnology
  • Medicine
  • Engineering
  • Education

Interdisciplinary and entrepreneurial opportunities may be created by using the chemistry degree in the context of other fields.